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Anxiety

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Dealing with a Nocturnal Panic Attack A Nocturnal panic attack tends to be one of the most frightening panic attacks a person can have. They interrupt sleep, and most of the time the panic sufferer wakes up mid-attack. Anyone who has ever experienced a nocturnal panic attack can vouch for how frightening the first time can be, and the confusion they experienced. Although panic attacks may seem to be random to some, there are actually a great number of factors and biochemical processes that occur during a panic attack that make it anything but chaotic at the outset. The human body actually reacts in a set number of stages, all of which help prepare the body and train it how to react. The Relationship between Alcohol and Panic Attacks Alcohol and panic attack experiences; when it comes to chronic panic attack disorder, drinking is perhaps the worst thing a person could do. Alcohol is considered a depressant, and most panic attack sufferers tend to be more susceptible to the effect of such chemicals. It is important to document your symptoms before visiting your doctor as you will be prepared to discuss them accurately. There are a variety of conditions that may cause anxiety attacks or an anxiety attack disorder. They include but are not limited to: low blood sugar levels, certain heart conditions, excessive intake of caffeine, drug use, tumors (some tumors cause excess adrenaline which can lead to anxiety attacks), or an overactive thyroid gland. A sign of anxiety attack can be anything from irregular heartbeats to chest pain. They also include: shaking, twitching, trembling, hot flashes, chills, “rubber legs”, tingling in extremities, difficulty sleeping, unpredictable sleeping patterns, body tension, aches and pains, sweating, clamminess, and stomach problems such as nausea or “butterflies”. Fight or Flight Mechanism When we sense danger, the body prepares itself to either fight or run away. This is known as fight or flight mechanism. This mechanism is triggered mostly by a part of the brain called Amygdale. Sometimes the brain misunderstands the message and a situation and translated it as dangerous when it is not in reality. 

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